What is Frozen Shoulder?

12 Ways to Heal a Frozen Shoulder

by Christiane Northrup, M.D.

Frozen shoulder is a very common occurrence in women between the ages of 40-60 years. The medical term for frozen shoulder is adhesive capsulitis (AC).  The symptoms include stiffness, pain, and limited range of motion in your shoulder. In the early stages, pain typically doesn’t prevent you from reaching up. However, reaching backwards, as if you were getting ready to throw a ball, tends to be painful. This is why frozen shoulder is sometimes referred to as “pitcher’s arm.”

Most doctors believe frozen shoulder is caused by an injury, overuse, or from an underlying condition such as diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. But, any shoulder problem can lead to a frozen shoulder if you do not work to keep full range of motion. Even sitting at a desk can be a contributing cause of frozen shoulder. When tension and stress get stored in our shoulders, circulation is limited.  This can start a cascade of chronic shoulder pain and loss of flexibility. And, the more you limit the use of your shoulder, the more the tissues around your shoulder stiffen and scar tissue forms. After a while, every day movements, and even sleeping, can become difficult.

Frozen shoulder is usually diagnosed by physical exam showing limited range of motion and pain.  Your doctor may also order X-rays and an MRI.  Frozen shoulder usually comes on slowly, then goes away slowly – usually within a year, but sometimes it can take up to 30 months or longer to heal. That is a long time to be in pain! And, if you have had frozen shoulder on one side, you may be 50 percent more likely to experience it on the other side.

My own frozen shoulders have been an on and off situation for nearly 5 years, but last summer the left started up with a vengeance. I have kept my mobility through Pilates, yoga, massage, and ARP Wave treatment. My shoulder is massively improved since last October when I couldn’t even put on a jacket because I could not move my left arm back at all.

Traditional Approach to Treating Frozen Shoulder Syndrome

A frozen shoulder typically moves through 4 stages — inflammation, freezing or stiffening, frozen, and then thawing. Treatment for a frozen shoulder is often aggressive, which is not always good.  But, if left untreated, a frozen shoulder can last years before resolving.

The traditional approach to treating a frozen shoulder is to use a combination of therapies, including anti-inflammatory medications, pain patches, steroid injections, physical therapy and surgery.  In the early stages, your doctor may prescribe prescription anti-inflammatory medications to lower inflammation and relieve pain.  If anti-inflammatory medications don’t relieve the pain and inflammation temporarily — remember they are never a cure — the next step is typically cortisone injections.  Again, steroids are not a cure and may cause problems down the road due to weakening the joint capsule and attachments.

During the inflammation and freezing periods, you may also be prescribed 8-12 weeks of physical therapy. This can be very painful, and with anti-inflammatory medications and steroids on board, you need to be careful not to over work your shoulder. While many physical therapists are trained specifically for helping people with shoulder problems, some are more generally trained.  You should ask what experience your therapist has with frozen shoulder.  Alternatively, you could try True Flexibility Training.

If your shoulder is completely frozen when you seek treatment, surgery will often be recommended. The surgeries that are often used include manipulation where, under general anesthesia, your arm is moved into different positions to stretch tight tissue, and arthroscopic surgery to cut tight tissues, remove scar tissue and more. Sometimes these surgeries are done together.

While this is the standard protocol, there are risks involved with all of these treatments. And, looking at frozen shoulder as simply a painful physical aliment while staying the course with traditional medications, therapy and surgery may not provide you with the relief you need. Most health issues arise as a reminder that something else is not working in your life.

Heal Your Emotions to Heal Your Shoulder Pain

In many respects, the intense pain of a frozen shoulder can be the biological equivalent of a life coach steering you away from what doesn’t support you.  And, shoulders have everything to do with personal responsibility and your ability to carry out your experiences in life with joy. If you feel you are constantly “shouldering the burden” then you will likely experience a frozen shoulder at some point, especially if you feel stuck in your current circumstances.  

Some common emotional patterns associated with a frozen shoulder include feeling that you need to carry the “weight of the world on your shoulders.”  Another common pattern is being too rigid in your thinking, or too set in your ways. A third common pattern is engaging in too much negative self-talk, which often means there is sadness associated with your physical pain.  

Because our bodies are made of energy, pinpointing the origin of your pain, and exploring your mental, emotional and energetic patterns may provide important steps toward healing from a frozen shoulder.  The exact location of your shoulder pain can be a clue to what is not working in your life. For example, pain in your shoulder blade area may mean you are focusing on something that is not serving your highest purpose. Pain toward the bottom edge of your scapula may mean you take on (but don’t release) other people’s problems, or give too much of yourself in a relationship. Likewise, the side of your body where your shoulder pain resides is a clue. Pain in your left shoulder may have to do with your past.  And, it usually has something to do with a woman, or the feminine. If your right shoulder is bothering you, it is usually about the future, a man, or the masculine aspects of your life.

12 Ways to Heal a Frozen Shoulder

It’s not uncommon that two people with the diagnosis of frozen shoulder have completely different manifestations of physical pain and very different emotional patterns as the root cause. 

Here are some other steps you can take to begin to heal from a frozen shoulder.

Make lifestyle changes. A diet full of fresh fruits and vegetables and omega 3 fatty acids and free of sugar and processed foods is the best way to eliminate chronic inflammation in your body. Supplements, such as turmeric and ginger, that target inflammation can be helpful. A good magnesium supplement may help with sore and tense muscles. And, antioxidants can help eat up free radicals. 

Stretch your body gently. Practicing healing yoga asanas such as shoulder shrugs, child’s pose with arms forward, eagle pose, and thunderbolt pose, as well as heart opening yoga poses such as camel, are good for opening your shoulders. I just completed a yoga retreat where we practiced a lot of restorative poses to open my chest and rotate my arms properly in the sockets and keep my arm pits open. At first this was very painful. But, I found that holding the pose and breathing into it for at least 20-30 seconds begins to remodel the fascia. I also found that I hold a lot of grief in my shoulders, which is gradually coming up and out. I will now be putting assisted back bends into my daily routine. If yoga is not your thing, you can try gentle stretches, such as the doorway stretch, which can help improve muscle flexibility and relieve pain. Another effective stretch is to lie on your bed close to the edge and allow your arm/shoulder to hang down. You can do this this for 10 minutes every day.

Improve your posture. Try and avoid the slumping forward, especially while at a computer. When you are slumped forward your arms move into a medially-rotated position, which cause tension and pain in the subscapularis. If you sit at a desk a lot, remember to move your arms (and the rest of you body) frequently. Reaching your arms up and behind your head  will help keep the subscapularis muscles stretched. While standing, try to pull your shoulder blades down and squeeze them toward the center of your back

Get a massage. Myofascial release massage targets the fascia. When the movement of the fascia is restricted it is impossible for you to move without experiencing pain. Myofascial release loosens up the frozen tissue which encourages a frozen shoulder to thaw.

Buy a TENS unit. TENS stands for Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation. A TENS unit delivers electrical stimulation through electrodes placed on your skin to relieve pain temporarily. Your insurance company may cover the cost of a TENS unit if one is prescribed by your health care provider.  Many physical therapists, chiropractors, and massage therapists also use these.

Try Tapping (EFT). Tapping is a great way to relieve both physical pain and its underlying cause. While you are Tapping, you can say, “even though I have this pain in my shoulder, I love and accept myself.”  Or, “even though I can’t move my arm, I love and accept myself.” You can also create your own affirmation. As you practice Tapping regularly you will notice that it unlocks the feelings associated with your pain.  As you unlock these emotions, you will also make great strides towards relieving your physical pain.

Shift your perspective.  If every day life circumstances make you tense up, such as your children messing up your home right after you have cleaned it, or your boss canning a project that you have worked hard to complete, you may hold that tension in your shoulders. Instead of looking at these situations as annoyances, try shifting to gratitude.  As you look at your messy house, try feeling gratitude for having your family in your life. View your work situation as a growth opportunity.  Having a “glass half full” attitude can help loosen tension in your body and set you on the path toward healing.

Release anger.  Responsibilities can often cause us to feel angry, especially when we feel that they are excessive, or that someone else is not carrying their own weight. Stored anger can cause pain in any area of your body.  Practice releasing anger while forgiving yourself (and others.)

Try acupuncture.  In Traditional Chinese Medicine, frozen shoulder is called “50 Year Shoulder” and is considered a wind-cold invasion. The more modern thinking is that persistent pain at a fixed site, such as with frozen shoulder, is also due to blood stasis.  Acupuncture needles inserted into trigger points and also the meridians that transverse the painful area can help relieve the source of shoulder pain and immobility.  In addition, Chinese herbal remedies for dispelling wind and cold and tonifying blood may help.  Be sure to ask your acupuncturist what is right for you.

Recite affirmations. Louise Hay’s affirmation for shoulder problems is “I choose to allow all of my experiences to be joyous and loving.”  You can also try “I am allowing love and joyous energy to flow through me freely.”  Depending on which shoulder is frozen, you can add “I balance my feminine (left side) or masculine (right side) energy easily and effortlessly.”  Finally, you can try saying, “with forgiveness, understanding and compassion, I bend and flow with ease.”  Try doing your affirmations in front of a mirror several times per day.

Employ visualization.  Imagine taking excess responsibilities off of your own shoulders and giving them back to the people they belong to.  When you are giving back responsibilities, be sure to do this with love. After you are done with releasing excess responsibilities, notice how your shoulders feel.

Open your heart to receive love.  Your shoulders are part of your 4th Chakra, known as the heart chakra. The lesson of the heart chakra is love and your heart chakra can become blocked when you are not open to receiving.  Energy enters your heart chakra right between your shoulder blades. To open your heart chakra, start by acknowledging that you are worthy of love. (This is particularly important for empaths!) Envision love, and abundance moving into the space between your shoulder blades. You can do this during meditation, or simply take a few minutes several times per day to practice this.  Another great way to receive loving energy is when someone offers you a compliment.  Simply say “thank you,” and then visualize the energy of love and appreciation entering your heart.

Remember, your body has the wonderful ability to heal when you allow it to.  A frozen shoulder is often a sign that you need to allow yourself to be flexible; to surrender and receive. As with any health symptom, frozen shoulder is not just physical. You need to work with it on all levels — body, mind, and spirit. The very worst thing you can do is nothing. And, if you keep moving in the same old way your body never gets new information to change and upgrade its patterns!

As I work with my shoulder in new ways, I feel as though my body is shedding the armor that was laid down when I was 4 years old, and a complete redo is happening.  The same goes for my hips — remember the hip and shoulder girdles are related. What happens down there goes right up to the shoulders.

Have you ever had a frozen shoulder?  How have you healed and what have you learned from your experience?

 

Christiane Northrup, M.D.

Christiane Northrup, M.D.

Christiane Northrup, M.D., is a visionary pioneer and a leading authority in the field of women’s health and wellness. Recognizing the unity of body, mind, and spirit, she empowers women to trust their inner wisdom, their connection with Source, and their ability to truly flourish.

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  1. Thank you for this blog! As a Movement Therapist and Pilates Teacher for over 3 decades, I also utilize affirmations, visializations, massage therapy and acupuncture along with my work. You are such a gift to all of us.
    Elizabeth Jones-Boswell, MEd
    Author of Exercise for Pregnancy, a Pilates-Based Approach for Women

  2. Alexa
    3 months ago

    This article was exactly what I was looking for. Literally. I googled Christiane Northrup Frozen Shoulder, because I was hoping that you’d have something to say about it.
    Thank you for addressing the emotional component! I am a healthy, active 52 year old single mom of a 13 year old girl. I practice yoga and ski regularly, but have never had a shoulder injury. Last year my left shoulder froze and as soon as it healed my right one went.
    In the past 4 years, I’ve left a bad marriage, changed careers, moved twice and had serious financial stress. Just when things seemed to be settling down, my ex-husband died suddenly. During all this I kept pushing through and doing what I had to do, and never even caught a cold. I found that odd, because I knew I was massively run down. I’ve suspected that the frozen shoulders were a manifestation from all that.
    Thank you for the validation of what I knew inside all along, and for the healing tips.

  3. Annette Chua
    4 months ago

    Dr. Northrup
    Thank you for your words of wisdom. I have struggled with frozen shoulder for three years always in my masculine side until last week. My step mother was in the hospital and family drama kicked in. Bam! there is was on my feminine side and with more pain than ever before. I used Essentrics by Miranda Esmonde-White for shoulder pain, in tears I pushed through. Two days later I went to see my primary physician for my annual wellness check up. My doctor talked to me about gratitude and from there we ended up talking about you. Your book Making Life Easy had found me the day before, she is a fan of yours too and plans to read it. Together with your teachings and Essentrics ( focused on fascia flexibility) my frozen shoulder cleared up within 2 days that has never happened. Thank you for opening my eyes to body pain being a sympton of my soul in pain and the Rx you have given me to awaken. Blessings to you with my deepest gratitude ❤️

  4. Karen
    4 months ago

    My frozen left shoulder came on slowly over 6 months or so. I was trying to heal using P. T., chiropractic, massage, acupuncture, yoga. It was steadily worsening. I asked a retired physical therapist relative what he knew about it. He showed me a few exercises to practice (which the previous P.T had not shown me!). I felt some release. I began to see a new physical therapist who seemed to know exactly what I needed to do. I agree with all the emotional, psychological components but for me it was two P.T. visits per week with ultrasound, painful stretches and that soon followed by exercises to continue stretching and finally strengthening. The other key for me was home practice. 20 minutes, twice a day. In one month I was feeling more than 60% better. By the end of the second month I was around 90% better. I felt it was so empowered and proud of my discipline which was required for me to heal.

  5. Ana
    5 months ago

    In the article first you say Right side is Masculine & Future and Left is Feminine & Past, then later you say the reverse? Which do you believe is M/F?? I think L = F & R = M

    1. Christiane L Northrup
      4 months ago

      Left is female and the women in your life ( e.g. mother). Right is masculine– and the men in your life.

      1. Janene
        4 months ago

        Hi
        Never knew about the differences, it makes so much sense now!!!
        So glad to be a part of this great newsletter
        Thankyou 🙂

  6. Melinda Tarver
    5 months ago

    Thank you for this post. I have been experiencing pain in my left shoulder for awhile now. I tried looking for an emotion explanation, but so far, I had not found anything that resonated with me. Until this blog, that is. Your blogs often seem to speak to me, specifically, and I greatly appreciate all you post. I like to draw oracle cards to give me a focus for the week, and lately every card I pull has told me I need to open my heart, but they haven’t really explained how to do that. You just did a better job of that than anyone else I have consulted. Can’t wait to get to work on your suggestion and feel the healing! You are a true blessing!

  7. Jean S.
    5 months ago

    Hi Dr. Northrup, Thank you for bringing to much wonderful information to all of us! What strikes me about all of this is no matter what the injury…..getting to the root of the emotional part and releasing that is crucial. I have had the best results with Reike and other pendulum energy work. It is simply amazing!!! I had Morton’s Neuroma in both feet to the point I could not wear any of my shoes. It was extremely painful and I didn’t know what to do. I was going through tremendous betrayal, grief from loss, and stress at the time…..thus “I could not move forward” in my life. I found a great person who does energy work and it was miraculous! After 3 sessions over two months time I was completely healed with no reoccurrence. I had to let go of all of it, forgive, let out all of my anger, etc. That was almost 4 years ago. I never felt better in my whole life at age 59! When I see your email in my in box I can’t wait to open it Dr. Northrup……always the most valuable information. I hope too that your shoulders completely heal and thank you so much for sharing that with all of us. Also love all the comments from the other readers of your blogs. Priceless!!!!

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      This is so inspiring!! Thank you so much!

    2. Jeanette
      4 months ago

      Hi Jean S.
      I’ve been battling with exactly this problem with both of my feet for a few months and seeking an answer as to why. Today, I believe you’ve given one to me. I’m so thankful that you chose to share your journey.
      —- I was going through tremendous betrayal, grief from loss, and stress at the time…..thus “I could not move forward” in my life—
      That sentence resonates with me. I’ll up my focus on releasing my anger, letting go of my grief, identifying and letting go of the betrayal that I’ve swallowed and will be moving more to set stress free from my body.
      I’m so grateful to you. Thank you from my heart to yours. Jeanette.

  8. Johanna
    5 months ago

    Had a bad arm last year. It wasn’t a frozen shoulder, but some sort of complex situation without a name! It was very painful to use this arm or even to reach over to get the sweet sugar lumps (sorry salt). At last I got physio therapy where they only gave me exercise (!). I was very sceptical, but after about 8 months of doing these exercises daily, it’s all better, but still can’t do push ups….
    I read through Dr. Northrups notes, and find these very useful, I will use it regularly and work on it. Thank you very much!

  9. energywriter
    5 months ago

    I’ve had pain in both shoulders for a little more than a year. The doctor said it was damaged, but not torn, rotator cuffs. She sent me to physical therapy that helped tremendously, but pain recurred frequently. After watching your video I realized that my pain was caused from carrying burdens that were not mine to carry. I released them and the pain went away. Occasionally, I feel a twinge of pain. I remind myself that I don’t have to carry pain from the past or what might happen. Today I’m healthy and safe. The pain stops almost instantly. When I learn to live in gratitude the pain will be non-existent.

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Brilliant!!!

  10. Brenda
    5 months ago

    Hi Dr Northrup I don’t know if this will get to you or not. I have been a fan of yours since the 80’s…time flys.This e-mail like most of yours resonated for me only more so. When I was in my mid thirties I started experiencing some pretty severe pain in my right shoulder. It continued to be problematic, affecting work and personal life. Over a period of years several drs a pa and an orthopedist diagnosed calcified tendonitis, with the help of x-rays and an MRI. I met with a surgeon who when I asked what the success rate was for having my shoulder opened up and the tendons scraped was not able to give me a good answer. I opted out of surgery and muddled along. Coincidental to this were…. life changes. I was in a relationship that was not right for me but I stayed because children were involved, 2 step and one son. I adjusted my diet from organic to cheaper foods..ie boxed meals and lots of spaghetti and sauce because the majority of the house (everyone but me) liked it. More on that in a minute… I quit a 15 year job with the state and went to work for a big box store because it was only 7 minutes from my home. I went into their management program excelled and was promoted with the intention of shooting for store manager or higher. My son was diagnosed with autism. My grandmother who I was very close with started her shift towards death. Getting the picture? My shoulders (Now at this point both. With some back pain as well) continued to be very painful. Work became overwhelming. ( Did I mention that along with all of this my ex husband and I had a business on the side? We grew and harvested over a ton of hard neck garlic and sold it at the local farmers markets. Our son got to be quite good at selling it with us. A wonderful experience for all of us. Even had a write up in the paper.) I had always been very physically active, bike riding, Nautilus some yoga that I learned from TV….I assumed this was normal for a very busy 30 something year old. My relationship deteriorated concurrent with our son’s diagnosis ( which was made based on observations of people around him and a psychiatrists evaluations…….. No one I came into contact with was really able to help me medically. I did lots of research which his dad had a hard time with. I know that he was heartbroken when our son was diagnosed, as evidenced by his inability to accept it. It took more time than I was willing to give. When My son was 17 I finally with the help of my best friend a 78 year young three time cancer survivor and organic gardening guru who also happens to be a sensitive like myself…..but I digress… stumbled on Valerian root. This herb saved my son’s life. The first time I gave it to him I was scared out of my mind due to him not being able to give me a lot of feedback in general about anything. He took it before bed. In the morning he did not seem much different. But told me he thought something was better. The second night he told me he wanted to take 2 pills not one. I was floored but agreed as the maximum dose was 3 capsules. The third night he told me he felt better but wanted all three. He began sleeping better. He began to calm down and several months later his special Ed teacher asked for a meeting where he told us that he was seeing a huge difference in our son in school. Zach my son had told him about the medicine he was taking. I told him about this Aurveydic herb and he said he was going to let other parents know about it. Success!) During this time I quit my job and stayed at home for 2 years to try and help my son who was not thriving. He was 12 at that time. I taught him to play with other children, ride a bike which he did not find to be all that enjoyable, and utilizing a digital tape recorder I introduced him to the world of pretend. He informed me when he was 14 that it is called LARP-ing…Live Active Roll Playing……who knew right? I had a strange rash during that time that was that most torturous thing I have ever experienced, doctors were baffled. Blood pressure went through the roof was put on medicine had allergic reactions to two of them. Finally settled on one then another. I began to have pain in my left foot diagnosed with planter fasciitis Meloxicam prescribed. Started limping got orthopedic insoles which helped but not much. Also developed heart palpitations. Doctors told me to lose weight, I had gained being home. I tried naproxen it worked better than the meloxicam. Took one every night before bed. After two years of being a house wife, where I was able to nurture my son and return to my love of the earth- organic gardening including lots of heirloom tomatoes, and help a lovely little stray named Toesy grow a litter of wild kittens, my grandmother died. Then my niece’s baby died. Then my Grandmother’s son, my mother’s brother died as well. A three month period. My grief was all encompassing I felt her absence like a physical barrier that I could not surmount. I returned to my watercolors which I had not had time for. I ended my 15 year relationship, re-entered the work arena,( A nice little medical devices company that has since gone corporate….planning for a career change.) and moved down the street into an apartment so our son would be able to navigate back and forth between the two residences. He was 14 at the time He is 21 now. I converted the 3 season back room into an art studio and let my creativity that I had put on the back burner grow again. About two years ago I was given the name of a great healer/physician. She was all about the natural body. I got myself and my son in to see her. We went to her for about 8 months. She told me that my levels looked pretty good and that I was not doing bad-kind of like give yourself a break…imagine. She listened to me and validated my reality but was not sure what was going on either, helped my son continue to understand the connection between diet and his body. Then she left the state. A year ago I had a conversation with my mom I was exhausted, in pain and felt sick all the time. We talk every day so a passing thing she said stuck with me. She mentioned that her Dad my grandfather who died when I was 11 was diagnosed with arthiritis when he was quite young. And that he had to quit doing physical work and he started his own business which he was very successful at, but she remembered that he said every time he ate tomatoes he had flare ups………yeah I never really liked tomatoes refused to eat them when I was young, including any kind of sauce, pizza..I scraped everything off it and ate the dough…..I am sure you understand as I do now after not eating tomato/products for the last year that I am allergic to them. I have not been tested per see but my Nurse practioner and I have had the conversation. Her best friend is also allergic to them and had similar issues. Her advice to me if I do eat them make sure they are well cooked…….none for me however. At this point I no longer limp minimal pain in left shoulder only. ( as long as I do my yoga practice) Down to just one blood pressure medicine, two naproxen in the last month and a half……I donated two pieces to an auction for Standing Rock. Apparently they created quite a buzz ( it’s a small town).I have stiffness in the morning and when I get home at night after work…did I mention that the place went through a consolidation where 50 people went in and out the doors due to stress and a sink or swim mentality that almost sunk the company? We will not even get into the post traumatic issues there….. I joined Simbi online and have bartered for Mayan birth glyph in exchange for one of my energy paintings. I am going to get my Reiki training finished and see what the glorious universe has to offer. My son is working part time I am now trying to figure out a way to get him to the Amen clinic in NY city for brain spect imaging…I think….hummmmm….pardon the lack of paragraphs so much to do. I Hope you find something useful here that may be helpful. Gotta go……

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Night shades… potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant and zucchini can cause arthritis symptoms in some people., thanks for the reminder!

  11. Cdk
    5 months ago

    Floatation Therapy in a sensory deprivation float tank is an amazing fascial release!!

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Oh we have one nearby. Just opened. I’ll make an appt! Thanks!

  12. Veronica Brighton
    5 months ago

    Emmett Therapy will help with this problem.

  13. Laurel
    5 months ago

    I had two frozen shoulders. Like most people, the recovery was painful and slow. Even after the pain was gone one arm wouldn’t lay flat on the floor when I did a full body stretch in yoga. One day a friend asked me if I wanted to try her Anat Baniel Method Move Into Life Class on DVD. I did the video class without any thought regarding my shoulder. My shoulder/arm not resting on the floor was something I didn’t think about. It was just the way it was and I was pain free. The next morning when I did my full body stretch, I was shocked to discover that both of my arms were flat on the floor. I wonder if I her DVD would have been helpful months earlier in my recovery.
    I remember the day I woke up and knew I had my second frozen shoulder. I had given my power away the day before. I allowed people to treat me like I was still the broken girl that I had once been. I was too afraid to speak my truth. To tell the “Experts” that they were clueless. Years later I see this as another step in my healing journey.

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Great story. Thank you!

  14. Rosella
    5 months ago

    Try Ashley Blacks FasciaBlaster and protocol for frozen shoulder. Look her up on YouTube. Join her group on Facebook. I am a user and benefitting tremendously. I am not paid for endorsing this tool. You owe it to your well being to at least check it out.

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      I have a fascia blaster and am on the Facebook group. Will check out the protocol. Thanks!

  15. Rhonda
    5 months ago

    I am printing this out for my MIL. Thank you Christine!!!

  16. Jane
    5 months ago

    Thank you Dr. Northrup for educating us regarding the “frozen shoulder” condition and for offering so many solutions involving body, mind and spirit! About 10 years ago, I had 2 frozen shoulders. Yes, it was painful and constricting! I visited an orthopedic surgeon and guess what he suggested? Surgery…imagine that! Because I believe the body can heal itself, I refused surgery and he referred me for physical therapy. I really made no progress with that. I referred myself, then, to my Japanese acupuncturist. He called the condition “forty year old shoulder” (as you mentioned in the article). I had probably no more than 5 or 6 treatments and the shoulders were perfect!
    I am so glad I did not go for the surgery as I have since heard that it often results in more pain and complications. Fast forward to today and I am a personal trainer. Proper body mechanics and strength training do wonders for prevention. I also teach clients to self-treat with myofascial release and trigger point therapy.

  17. Cathy White
    5 months ago

    Thank you Kathryn! Yes!

  18. Kamna Narain
    5 months ago

    Thank you for this! I had a bad case of frozen shoulder a few years ago and it was definitely a combination of physicial and emotional triggers. Fortunately I have a wonderful DO who is my primary care physician and we used a combination of osteopathic manipulation, acupuncture and specialized physical therapy for my healing. No pain killers, no shots, no surgery – I was adamant about that! It took about 18 months and a lot of work, but I’m better now. A bit atrophied, so working to strengthen that left arm again!

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      That atrophy is something, isn’t it! Makes you realize that most of the decline in muscle strength we associate with aging is just from not using the muscles!!

  19. Patrice
    5 months ago

    Excellent information! I am 66 and had frozen shoulder (the left one) around 2010. At the time I was under a lot of stress as I was responsible for a mentally ill sibling. The day before it really got bad, I’d carried a back pack for several hours. I received massage therapy over several weeks and finally got my flexibility back. A very painful experience I don’t want to repeat. I now stretch daily, do shoulder rolls and am careful with my posture at the computer.

  20. Lisa
    5 months ago

    Fabulous information. I developed frozen shoulder three years ago when I was getting our property ready for my daughters wedding. I was a bundle of emotions during those days; I was overjoyed for her, but I was sad for what I had lost myself since I had been sexually abused and never got to chose my first love as she had with the man she was marrying. Reading this, it makes sense I ended up with frozen shoulder.
    I ended up going to an acupuncturist for relief and it helped. I still have some stiffness, but with this new knowledge, I am hoping to move things to complete healing. Thanks for this Dr. Northrup.

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Great insight!

  21. Janis Thomas
    5 months ago

    I’ve had the cold shoulder for years. I stopped all forms of therapy last year as I was fed up with yet another practitioner saying ” well, I just don’t know what to do anymore.” I worked it on my own but decided in the end I would just have to live with it, that is until a friend told me about The FasciaBlaster. After using it for less than a week I had full range of motion in my shoulder. I was dumbfounded and ecstatic. That was 2 mos ago. I continue to use the FsciaBlaster as part of my regular self-care regimen along with resistance training, yoga and Pilate’s.

    1. Susanna
      5 months ago

      Can you explain what the FasciaBlaster is? Thank you!!

      1. Kathryn Wells
        5 months ago

        You’ll find a lot of information about fascia in this article by Dr. Northrup: http://www.drnorthrup.com/muscle-fascia/

        Read through the great conversation in the comments for more info on the FasciaBlaster too!

      2. Christiane Northrup
        4 months ago

        Just go to you tube and put in Ashley Black fascia blaster. There are many videos that explain this. Or get her book It’s Not Cellulite, It’s Fascia.

  22. Lisa Morris
    5 months ago

    I had frozen shoulder in my L shoulder 2 yrs ago.. I was 46.. I got one injection and did 2-3 mo of Physical therapy.. I now have 90-95% range of motion and the pain is mostly gone..occasionally will ache when stressed or sick or tired.. Now I’m 48 and my other shoulder has been starting to ache for the past 6 mos.. I hope it doesnt turn into frozen shoulder.. I am happy to run into this article, I believe I will try the open heart yoga and also be less hard on myself.
    Many thanks

  23. Margaret Roe
    5 months ago

    I had a very painful and nearly frozen left shoulder two years ago. With physical therapy I’m fine now though I sometimes notice I twinge with certain movements. Most interesting to me is Dr. Northrup’s mention of the emotional component. My shoulder pain in came along during a time of stress, anxiety and grief. Thank you Dr. Northrup for making the connection! This knowledge will surely help me to be more sensitive to the mind, spirit, body connection.

  24. Elizabeth
    5 months ago

    This is an excellent article. Thank you, Dr. Northrup for writing it and I hope your shoulders thaw soon!
    I had frozen shoulder in first one then the other shoulder for over two years.
    I tried many of the modalities listed in the article, some helped more than others. Acupuncture as well as a Tens Type Unit probably gave me the most short-term relief. I said the affirmations in Louise Hay’s book. What helped me the most was the knowledge that for most people it will just go away eventually. I kept telling myself that through the excruciating pain.
    Given that it happpens for so many women in their early 50s (myself included) I wonder if hormonal changes are affecting the musculature somehow?
    Finally, I tried to find the blessing in this, and what I came up with is that it opened me to having more understanding and compassion for those in chronic pain.

  25. Marisol Muñoz
    5 months ago

    The best treatment for frozen shoulder, stiff neck, back pain, even knee arthrosis, are sessions with a Chiropractic.

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      If you go to the right one.

  26. Shirley Plant
    5 months ago

    This is good to know, I have been suffering with a frozen shoulder since August. It was so painful in the beginning and then is began to freeze to the point of almost no movement. Now it is starting to thaw and I am doing some physio. I am 51 and anyone else who I have spoken when about having it has also been in their fifties when experiencing frozen shoulder.

  27. Larry Burk, MD, CEHP
    5 months ago

    Chris, I appreciate your comprehensive overview that includes tapping with EFT for anger and other emotions stuck in the shoulder. As you know I has able to heal mine 10 years ago in about 3 months and never got a recurrence on the other side. It amazes me how focused most of the frozen shoulder patients are on the sometimes brute force physical approaches without ever considering the emotional components. They get very angry about being frozen, when the anger may have been there all along. https://journal.thriveglobal.com/do-you-have-anger-frozen-in-your-shoulder-434c13350c4a#.aweefvm1e

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Thanks so much for posting this Larry. Your story and your blog on this are invaluable!!

  28. Lisa
    5 months ago

    I found myself with frozen shoulder on my left side over a year ago. I did physical therapy for 13 weeks, had injections that didn’t work and took pain medication. I did exercise at home and the shoulder felt a bit better. Months later, my right shoulder went into frozen mode. I have recently taken up paddling and although it hurts like hell, it is loosening up some. Is paddling a good or bad thing to be doing with this condition?

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Paddling is fine. Keeps the joints functioning.

  29. Renu
    5 months ago

    I used to get frozen shoulder on and off between age 45 and 48 until i learned energy healing work. Not only i learned to self heal but also helped so many women heal their frozen shoulders. Thanks to energy work I never got frozen shoulder again for last decade or so. I found it was stress related. Also we women suppress our emotions that accumulate in back solar plexus area and cause frozen shoulder, back pain or stomach issues.

  30. Sara
    5 months ago

    My chronic pain started with frozen shoulder then got way worse. My Dr said I had Myofacial Pain Syndrome. My neck was frozen too. After suffering for 10 years with the wrong doctor….I found a Neuromuscular Dr that has helped me recover with fascia release, manipulation, adjustment…& the best thing that worked the best was #prolotherapy injections. Prolotherapy heals ligaments, tendons, fascia & muscle. Just recently I started TRE, Trauma Release Exercises. The exercises get your muscles to shake then your central nervous system takes over & loosens the fascia & tight muscles. Wow what a difference!! I highly recommend everyone try TRE.

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Sounds good! Thanks

  31. Mona Noorian
    5 months ago

    Wow, did you get my ESP mail?!
    I’m so grateful for you and the helpful information you provide. My Mom has been dealing with this and I knew it was linked to emotional factors. Just sent this to her. Thanks so much. We really appreciate you! ❤️️

  32. Milly Robinson
    5 months ago

    Thanks for this blog, I have had bad tendinitis in my right shoulder , and I am trying to stop it from progressing any further my , neck is also giving me pain , as this is all connected, I have just started PT which should help, but now I will concentrate on the emotional part, as I am carrying the weight of being a widow, with three children in college, and a 80 year old mother who also needs me, which I feel this all on my shoulders, so I have come to realize it is time to take care of me, so I can get better..great treatment ideas

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      You’ve GOT IT!

  33. Lauri
    5 months ago

    I also suffer with frozen shoulder so I found the article very interesting. It’s coming up on almost a year for me. First the doc gave me a steroid injection and ordered PT. The injection relieved pain for only 3 weeks. PT was painful and I was glad when it was over, it didn’t help much. I didn’t take the anti-inflammatory meds because of stomach issues. Stayed semi-active with yoga but obviously had to modify most things. Time passed then another follow-up with the doc. Insurance finally approved an MRI which showed frozen shoulder, partially torn rotator cuff, bicep tendonitis and early, mild signs of arthritis (I’m 54 by the way). Next step, another cortisone shot with more PT and this time taking meloxicam along with omeprizole to protect the stomach, told to come back after doing this for 2 full months. I have 1 more PT and my follow up scheduled for May 5. It’s been much better this time but I fear the anti-inflammatory is only masking it. I’m not compliant with the exercises (no good excuse) but I do try to stretch when I think of it throughout the day. If I report not feeling better the doc will suggest surgery. I think after reading this article and seeing some other people’s experiences with surgery I will probably opt to try some other non-invasive, integrative type practices. When I consider emotional, spiritual ideas I think I have carried too much and had a closed heart but this is changing. I’m making positive changes in how I parent (encouraging kids to do more) and am working on opening my heart. I’ll work on healing myself before going under the knife. Thank you Dr. Northrup!

  34. Brenna
    5 months ago

    This information came along at the perfect time, thank you! I had noticed the pain in my right scapula tended to flare up in direct proportion to what I was feeling emotionally, so when it did come to my attention, I would mentally pause and consider what my body was trying to tell me. I still hadn’t associated the pain with my heart chakra, though, but I am finding this article makes perfect sense when I consider the situation and relationships in my life. I like the way this article touches on a multifaceted approach to healing this condition.

  35. Tammy
    5 months ago

    What a wonderful article and very insightful follow up comments. I had a frozen left shoulder in 2014. At that time following conventional treatment we thought it was created through work/ overuse injury, however all tests revealed no physical evidence. In hindsight, and under the loving care of my naturopath, I became aware of my emotions of (empty nest)first child to leave home and perimenopause. Two weeks ago the left shoulder has flared up again. I have just returned from looking after two aging parents with health concerns. This time around I will start with the emotional aspect and work my way through the other therapies. In my experience I have found IMS (intramuscular stimulation) to work for me.

  36. S Lynne
    5 months ago

    So glad to see this piece, thank you – and a Q. My own double experience with fully frozen shoulder has been resolved by a year of intensive hands-on PT, with a steroid injection midway through that allowed the musculature to relax enough that the PT could get in there to do the deeper work needed. I completely get that the emotional awareness and healing you describe here would have made an impact then and will help now to prevent further episodes. Q = I now have trouble nearby in my neck and TMJ. I believe this is considered throat chakra so presumably a slightly different set of recommendations (would love you to address those! ) but have also read that shoulder is considered part of same throat package. Could it vary or is that mistaken? Thanks and best!

  37. Aimee Phillips
    5 months ago

    This article and each comment is exactly what I need right now. Right frozen shoulder since about November. I think all this is really going to help. Thank you, everyone, for sharing your experiences.

  38. Renee
    5 months ago

    This article is a relief to read and definitely start a daily exercise and yoga routine. I’ve noticed when something negative happens in my day my shoulder instantly will flare up. What do you think about PRP injections? I am considering this over a steroid inj. Sounds like in the long term it would be better than anything else to help your body heal. Love you and thank you for bringing up this subject. Hope your shoulder is improved.

  39. Maggie
    5 months ago

    With my frozen shoulder, I found Clair Davies’ book “the Frozen Shoulder Workbook” very helpful in staying functional and fairly pain-free (except when trying to reach up and back into “cactus” pose). The book gives very thorough deacriptions of the involved muscles and how to do self-myofascial release several times a day.

    1. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Sounds like a great resource. Thank you!

  40. Gwen
    5 months ago

    Two years ago my left shoulder froze. It was frozen for about 9 months before it started clearing up. The doctor gave me a cortisone shot (it did not help) and prescribed physical therapy, which was terribly painful (though I am sure it was necessary, my shoulder would not budge!). Once the shoulder started thawing, I started doing the Classical Stretch program daily on PBS. I credit this program with helping me gain mobility and strength back. Its interesting what you say about emotions. At the time my shoulder froze, I was in a job that was not a good fit for me and I hated. I’ve since left that job too….

  41. Lina
    5 months ago

    Anthony Willimas, the Medical medium mentions the frozen shoulder as part of the Epstein Barr Virus. You may wantt to check his information to include this approach.

    1. Consuelo
      5 months ago

      Hi Lina,

      Actually, Anthony Williams talks about Frozen Shoulder being due to the Shingles virus, not EBV. I have found that information extremely helpful, as I had had Frozen Shoulder THREE times (alternating shoulders) over the years. Now, when it feels like it wants to freeze up again, I make sure I’m supporting my liver and work to keep my diet very clean, and I continue my stretches and movement, rather than retreating from movement. But I also think the emotional component that Dr. Northrup mentions is extremely relevant and healing too.

      1. Wendy
        5 months ago

        Yes he does, I had never heard of any connection to a virus and frozen shoulder. I had never had anything like it before. It started almost two years ago, alternating shoulders. It would come and go and now there is only a hint of it. I truly believe in the mental/emotional component to this and all symptoms/conditions but it was also relieving to read that it could also be caused by a virus. So taking this into consideration, the virus must be dormant, then the combination of life stresses and the changes that so many women go through during peri-menopause triggers the frozen shoulder. Thank you for all the wonderful information.

    2. Christiane Northrup
      4 months ago

      Anthony is a good friend of mine. I love his work. He often talks about how stress will cause viruses to become activated. What he calls stress, I call anger,resentment, all those hidden emotions we’ve been told NOT to have. So they go into our tissues instead!!!

  42. Lori Jean
    5 months ago

    This couldn’t have come at a better time! Since January I have had issues with my left shoulder. The symptoms are pretty much as described. I find it is worse on bad weather days and better on dry days. I have become very sensitive to weather changes as I get older. I started working with tennis ball as recommended by my chiropractor, but this article reminds me that I carry stress in my shoulders. I always have. I think I have some emotional work to do as well.

  43. Carol
    5 months ago

    Wow! So happy I saw this. I have been going through hip and shoulder pain for some time. I am a very lay back kind of person but feel the need for change in my life both career and location. I see a wonderful neuromuscular Doctor and a massage therapist for the pain. But you nailed it! I kinda felt my problems could be stress related, that was my gut feeling. Thank you! Love and light to you.

  44. Paula
    5 months ago

    Acupuncture worked for me within a week. No pain at all now 4 months later.

  45. Kym
    5 months ago

    Hello Dr Northrup,

    I had a frozen shoulder about 2 years ago. I honestly did not know what on earth happened to me as I was doing heavy lifting and I think that contributed to this. I went to the doctor and had an x-ray and it was confirmed. I then underwent a mild operation to force the joint moving again, and I have to say it worked! Immediately after I came home from the operation I began physio and I did not give in to the pain. I had water physio as well and I applied yoga stretches. Today, my shoulder is a little stiff when I apply a certain yoga stretch, but other than that I am fine. I was told by the same doctor who operated on me that a small percentage have to have the operation again, thank goodness I was not one of them.

  46. CJ Anderson
    5 months ago

    OMG! My frozen shoulder, came right after my first stroke from brain bleeds! I went from type A wonder woman to a handicapped wheelchair, aphasia bound person who if it wasnt for friends, would have ended up homeless. I did have 6 months of therapy, and them I continued to run my non-profit as a volunteer lifting twisting turning bags of dog food. Now what helped me was getting prolo-therapy shots, but the key element was the grief! Fortunately, I taught about generational differences, and I saw already the deep grief of babyboomers who suddenly were not perfect any more. I know that part of my revised mission is to go out and let people see me being functional. I still feel a deep grief at not being seen as hire able, worth having in the workplace any more! Now my right knee doesn’t work. I know it is not wanting to move forward any more! Thank you for this!

  47. Marsha Conner
    5 months ago

    What great information. I wish I had seen it 5 yrs ago. I assumed I had a frozen shoulder, Went to 5 different doctors and chiro at the time. One shoulder expert convinced me to do the steroid shots. He did 4 each two weeks apart and said it was safe. It did not work and I found my self with dead bone in that shoulder. I needed a full shoulder replacement. I had to have the surgery. I have about 80% of my range of motion back and no pain so I am happy with that. But I am convinced the steroid shots damaged my bones. I can not prove that of course. I would do much different today. Thanks

  48. Patricia
    5 months ago

    Thank you for noting that the hip is connected to the shoulders. I had frozen shoulder a couple of years ago, and managed to heal it with the support of a chiropractor, acupuncturist and others. But my left hip has been bothering me off and on for a number of years — so I will now start using affirmations and other suggestions you’ve made for the heart, to help my hip. Thank you!

  49. Mary
    5 months ago

    Everything you say is truth. I am a prime example. I had a frozen shoulder years ago while in a tremendous amount of stress with a child in the hospital from a dog bite and my father having to be admitted to a psych hospital at the same time and I was the chosen one to handle all of it. Overnight my left shoulder became completely frozen and remained that way for almost 2 years. Finally they manipulated it twice and it was better but I went through hundreds of dollars of VERY painful PT 4 days a week month after month. Recently my husband and I visited my daughter and her husband in CA. I have been suffering intense grief since they moved out there 2 years ago. (She is my only child) The day I returned home and walked into my kitchen, I felt like someone had hit my shoulder with a sledge hammer. It didn’t freeze but there was intense pain. Saw docs, X-rays, PT and finally acupuncture which has been the only helpful thing. I truly believe the pain was attached to my grief.

  50. Christine
    5 months ago

    Thank you Dr. Northrup!
    I too have had frozen shoulder. Yes very painful to try and dress myself. I was told that I had a 50% chance of my left side having the same issue but fortunately it didn’t happen. What has really worked for me was acupuncture and cupping. I find acupuncture and the Bob Cooley program for streching the fascia and scar tissue have helped me through. With the stagnent blood now moving out of the area my arms feel much better. I can sleep on them with no problem. The emotional part, yes I’ve been working on that through doing The Work of Byron Katie with amazing results in relieving anger, not being overly responsible anymore and of course loving myself…putting myself first!
    Thank you for your blog,
    Christine

  51. Wendy
    5 months ago

    Such great information, I wish I had known some of this when I first had frozen shoulder (10 years ago). The very worst part for me was that the Dr. that I originally went to never told me what I had! He gave me a perscription for anti inflams and said “keep that shoulder moving so it doesn’t freeze”. What? So I took the pills, tried to move it, never went to physio for at least 8 weeks after since he hadn’t recommended that. Another Dr. did and explained it to me. So began my frozen shoulder story that continues to this day. There isn’t a therapy I haven’t tried! Some helped, some didn’t. My Chiropractor at one point just said he really couldn’t do much more for me (ART) and didn’t feel comfortable taking my money anymore 🙁 I had 2 surgeries, the first one was relatively successful and I gained some motion but it wasn’t much. Maybe an inch or two. My surgeon was determined to fix me (he said I was the worst case he had seen) so 2 years later I had a 2nd surgery where they planned to keep me in the hospital for 4 days and keep a line in to numb my shoulder and arm and then have aggressive physio for 3 days after the surgery. Unfortunately my shoulder was dislocated during the surgery so the aggressive physio plan was cancelled. Thats when I quit all therapies – except for my own exercises and so now I have about 90 degrees of movement – thats it. Also have tennis elbow in my right arm – likely as a result of over use due to the left having limited motion. I need to do more yoga and Qi Gong which is on my to do list 🙂 My recommendation to anyone with this afflication – immediate physio – every kind listed in this article and some that aren’t! Stretch it every day and keep the muscles active.

    1. Kathryn Hall
      5 months ago

      I had 0 mobility and gained 45 degrees immediately after finding a new chiropractic technique called the OTZ technique, which is for frozen shoulder. It is treated as a neurological condition caused by a misalignment of the skull on the 1st verrebra. I regained full mobility very quickly after being completely frozen for 6 months. The technique is being taught all over the world, try to find a chiro who does it, it really works. For additional information on OTZ visit: http://www.otzhealthed.com/portfolio-items/video-anamaion and http://www.youtube.com/user/frozenshoulderdoctor

  52. Stephanie
    5 months ago

    Curious if anyone knows why it is important for empaths to acknowledge they are worthy of love?

    1. Kathryn Wells
      5 months ago

      Speaking as an empath, our abilities are adaptations grown from childhoods where we had to develop a sixth sense to determine if a parent would be in a good mood or on a rampage. In families where this was the dynamic, we took it upon ourselves to try to heal our unhappy parents so that they would have the emotional capability to show us unconditional love, but it was a fruitless task. The trial of the empath is to stop trying to recover the lost love they didn’t receive in childhood, and to provide it for themselves now and retroactively.

      1. Mer Boel
        5 months ago

        Thank you Kathryn for sharing this! I’m still on this journey as an empath, and appreciate you putting the challenges so succinctly! Luckily my older sister has been able to model how a loving parent would be, it has been very healing for me to watch her be a mother to her two girls… and she also has validated what our mother was like to us, which has been helpful.

        1. Kathryn Wells
          5 months ago

          How wonderful you had a model in your sister, Mer! I believe there is a reason for everything, even our challenges…they prepare us for helping others, like your sister did for you, and as I’m sure you’re doing for your loved ones and your community. Compassion for self, forgiveness of parent is the key to healing.

      2. Monique
        5 months ago

        Thank you, Kathryn for this wonderful explanation. This is really helpful!! _()_

      3. Linda Caldwell
        5 months ago

        Dear Kathryn:

        I loved your comment. Are you part of an empath group? I would love to join.

        1. Kathryn Wells
          5 months ago

          Hi Linda!! I am not a part of a group, but I did have a friend/teacher who found me and helped me heal many decades of resentment towards my mother with journeying. Journeying is a method of returning (in your emotions and mind) to the place of painful childhood memories and then directing them, like a movie to give yourself what you didn’t receive, but needed then. Here’s an article that describes what that was like for me: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ronald-alexander-phd/mindfulness-practice_b_4047094.html

          I also found the following book to be quite helpful in reducing my empathically-generated anxiety, and for having better boundaries. I used to be a sponge, haha, but now I can better control when I use empathy, and when I shut it off. Empathy is a gift to have; but it’s important to be able to use it willfully, rather than let it use you. Your 30-Day Plan for Empath Empowerment: https://www.amazon.com/Become-Most-Important-Person-Room/dp/0975253875.

          I also just learned that Judy Orloff, M.D. is coming out with a book soon called the Empathic Survival Guide. Here’s the link for that too. http://www.drjudithorloff.com/empath-survival-guide-promo/

          I hope that helps! Most of all, know that you’re not alone, and if you’re looking for a group, intend that it will happen in perfect Divine timing! *hugs*

      4. Karen
        5 months ago

        Been there – done that. The empath route was also mine and Kathryn your comments really rang true for me. Thank you. I had and have completely healed frozen shoulder through acupuncture and exercise a couple of years ago. I learned that stress also contributes to frozen shoulder.

        1. Kathryn Wells
          5 months ago

          So glad acupuncture and physical therapy provided long-term healing for you, Karen! Been there — done that, indeed! Kudos!

      5. Clare
        5 months ago

        Thank you so much for this description Kathryn. I have done a lot of reading and used various techniques throughout my adult life in an attempt to move on from a childhood exactly as you described, but have been left with anger and resentment about the futility of it all. The words “We took it upon ourselves to try to heal our unhappy parents so that they would have the emotional capability to show us unconditional love, but it was a fruitless task” are very freeing for me. It feels like I can begin to let it all go at last. Thank you again.

  53. Ruth Nottage
    5 months ago

    I have helped countless people recover from frozen shoulder using the Rossiter System. Last week I helped a woman who has been suffering for 15 years. After two sessions she has no pain nor mobility restrictions. The very first shoulder technique I received in Rossiter 8 years ago got rid of a neck/shoulder pain I had had for 10 years, and it’s never come back. That’s why I became a master practitioner and am a tireless advocate of work that has proven to be safe, reliable, and non invasive. Rossiter targets and releases the fascial adhesions that “freeze” the shoulder. Younger people always heal faster, but I recently had significant results with a 91 year old woman with frozen shoulder. We have probably 1000 testimonials for the Rossiter System’s efficacy and we are approved by risk management for the State of Wyoming, and are CPT code billable nationally.

  54. Jean MacBarron
    5 months ago

    I am 61 and I have had frozen shoulder on the left for two years. It is not painful anymore, but I still have some restricted movements. I have tried steroid injections, PT, gentle yoga, stretches, and am now working with a PT, that was trained in the Barnes method of myofascial release. Finally, I think all of this is working, and hopefully my other shoulder doesn’t decide it needs more attention!

  55. Patricia
    5 months ago

    Both my shoulders are frozen,
    I know I carry the upsets of my children and grandchildrens problems and grief about my sons untimely death age 21 in a workplace accident

  56. Ann
    5 months ago

    Very interesting as I have been on the same journey and am just into my 50’s! I am doing a combination of PT, yoga, massage therapy, acupuncture, stretching. In addition, I have found that a weighted tuning fork placed on the bone of the shoulder has helped to restore vibration to the area. I also sing mantras which help to open heart and throat chakras which are both related to shoulders. One has to use your voice to ask for help, express the anger, the overwhelm, and defend oneself. Thank you for holistic approach!

  57. JT
    5 months ago

    I had 2 frozen shoulders in 2010. The surgeon would not operate and the chiropractor and physical therapist could not help me after multiple sessions. I am grateful that 30 sessions of acupuncture worked for me. It was a complete cure and I have had no reoccurrences.

  58. Cora
    5 months ago

    Yes I have had trouble with a frozen shoulder as well as now I have calcified tendinitis in my left shoulder. I do tend to feel the weight of responsibility on my shoulders and praying and meditation helps me release those strong and sometimes very deep emotions. I am learning in the last two years to cry….I was taught not to cry as it wouldn’t solve anything…..hmmmm….my tears have healed much pain! Concentrating on a life of peace and joy and honouring this body I was gifted with has helped a great deal. Stretching each day keeps me moving and water helps….moving in water is very relaxing.❤

  59. Dot
    5 months ago

    Yes, I have had a frozen shoulder for 18 months. Steroid injections were a waste of time. What helped was a hydrodylatation needle. It is basically Stalin injected at the site to stretch the ligaments. Very painful but worth it. Recently my other shoulder has started to hurt. I am just gently exercising it and taking omega 3. Hopefully that will be enough.

  60. Sandy
    5 months ago

    At this point in time for me it’s true…Shoulder pain and restrictions. Yes it happened before. Doing many of your list. Slowly getting better. Not soon enough.. emotional scars are tough for me. Up during night…
    I am getting better​. Positive response to positive thinking..

  61. Carol
    5 months ago

    From age 50 to 53, I had two frozen shoulders, each lasting about a year, with a year between the two. I could no longer do yoga as I did not have the strength needed. I got physical therapy for the first one, then met a physical therapist who said they are common in women and often resolve on their own after eight months. With the second, I did no physical therapy but sought out all sorts of alternative therapies. What worked, I believe, was energy healing and therapeutic writing. I do believe the frozen shoulders reflected my state of mind at the time, which was an overwhelming sense of responsibility and sadness. The energy work and writing freed up my shoulder and freed me emotionally for the next chapter of my life. It has been ten years and I have not had further problems with either shoulder.

  62. Lorraine Hepple
    5 months ago

    Hi Christiane,

    What a very interesting article on frozen shoulder. I have just recovered from a frozen left shoulder, last year. So painful and disabilating. Feeling like you shouldering the burden of lots of things rang very true to me. It certainly makes sense that emotions from the past effect the present. I lost my Mother when I was 13 and then my Father when I was 14. I an 62 now and I have always supported the family being the eldest. It also came on after I was diagnosed with Osteoporosis, so all very interesting. I love yoga and Pilates too, which helps to strengthen the body. My Physio helped me in so many ways to heal. Thank you for your wonderful words. Lorraine

  63. Pat
    5 months ago

    After months of unsuccessful physical therapy, my acupuncturist tried a needle in the calf opposite to the frozen shoulder. She manipulated it for a few (painful) minutes, applied heat, and the next day it started to clear up and was completely gone by the second day.

    1. Ellen Farrell
      5 months ago

      Calf is related with TW and Bladder meridian-addressing how the nervous system got blocked due to trauma. Unblocking this allows the pain stuck in the heart energy to move, and to get grounded in the NOW!

  64. Darcy Olejniczak
    5 months ago

    This article came to me at the exact right time!! I had frozen shoulder in my left arm years ago. Now my right shoulder has some major issues. I just started some every other day stretching with a band exercises from my chiropractor. But this article reminded me that I really need to work on the mental, emotional part!! Being 48 and my boys are grown I am struggling with finding my life purpose and loving myself, especially physically during menopause. I am confident I can heal myself soon!! Thank you for the reminder!!

  65. Susana Lorenzo
    5 months ago

    Thanks for sharing this. I’ve had my left shoulder frozen for more than 7 months. I’ve tried some stretching and Tai-Chi but it hurts when I try to move it. I cannot move it upwards or backwards. Trying to fasten my bra can be a nightmare or even getting dressed with tight clothes, there are certain movements which I cannot do.
    Everything you tell about emotions and conflicts does resonate to me.
    I should do more work on that.

    1. Ellen Farrell
      5 months ago

      Calf is related with TW and Bladder meridian-addressing how the nervous system got blocked due to trauma. Unblocking this allows the pain stuck in the heart energy to move, and to get grounded in the NOW! Per another comment – go to a massage therapist who works with sub-scapular issues! Fixed in one day! Also, I had an energy medicine client with left shoulder, long term shoulder issues, definitely re: past relationship pain (controlling x-husband). Working in the heart Chakra on this issue unfroze the shoulder. Powerful release, both emotionally and physically.

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